EDITORS’ PICK

Creatures Great and Small

ANIMAL KINGDOM

Animal Kingdom Editors’ Pick

Following Tim Flach’s selection of winning images for our recent ANIMAL KINGDOM competition, this compilation of 20 images represents some of the other talented photographers whose work struck us and left a mark. Each a stunning image worthy of exposure and attention…

These are intended to be a conversation starter… so feel free to join the discussion on our social networks.

This month’s selection was made by Kate O’Neill. Kate is Creative Director at The Visual Loop – a company that runs exhibitions, creative workshops and artist talks for businesses, communities and organizations. Prior to that she managed the Marketing & Partnerships Department at Metro Imaging, coordinating our outreach programs, professional development talks, workshops and mentorship programs, and was Festival Manager for Brighton Photo Fringe. She is Founding Director of The Old Girls’ Club, a network supporting women across the photography industry, and is a regular speaker, reviewer and mentor for photographic events and initiatives across the UK.

BANNER IMAGE COURTESY OF ALAN YEE
www.alanyee.com / @alanyeephotographer

Editor’s comment: Nostalgic analogue colour combination with a subject matter hard to ignore. The snake being held up in the foreground defining the ethos of snake charming culture, cleverly composed to create a sense of anticipation.

IMAGE COURTESY OF CAMILLE BRIOTTET
www.camillebriottet-photography.com / @camillebriottetphotography

Editor’s comment: Beauty and viciousness clash in this scene, with muted tones setting a harmonious backdrop for these brawling beasts. A well timed shot of a dramatic yet instinctive event.

IMAGE COURTESY OF LIDIA CHAVINSKAIA
www.lidiachavinskaia.wixsite.com/photography / @lidphotography

From the series Cowscapes – “My series Cowscapes questions the place of domesticated animals in our society. They are more and more numerous to produce food for the growing humanity, but, placed in ‘above ground’ intensive breeding systems, they are less and less present in our landscapes. Here, I use the patterns offered by the dress of the world’s most industrialized cattle breed – the Holstein – to recreate surrealist landscapes.”

Editor’s comment: It’s hard to get tired of such an aesthetically pleasing image – from the crop to the playful use of shape and pattern. Additionally, the layering of the image, where the natural soft subject is set against a structured man-made background, poses the viewer with questions on our use of cattle in mass farming and agriculture.